Uptick in avian flu cases poses little threat to humans

Risk of transmission to people and pets is very low unless you're regularly in contact with birds

Uptick in avian flu cases poses little threat to humansIf the recent increase in avian influenza cases has you concerned, you likely have nothing to worry about and don’t need to take any added measures, according to a University of Alberta expert on influenza in birds. As with human flu, there are a variety of strains of avian flu, explains Katharine Magor, a professor…

We drastically overreacted to the COVID-19 pandemic

One of the greatest peacetime policy failures in Canada’s history

We drastically overreacted to the COVID-19  pandemicCOVID-19 just ain’t what it used to be. The SARS-CoV-2 virus was never as deadly as feared in its early days and has evolved to be even less so today. The vaccines rushed to production in response weren’t the answer that some hoped and they’ve proved less effective as the virus evolves. It’s high time…

Canada has its own baby formula problem

Its largest baby formula plant ships all its products to China

Canada has its own baby formula problemParents of toddlers are concerned about baby formula shortages due to a combination of factors. A major recall in the United States affecting the top manufacturer of baby formula, coupled with supply chain challenges, has made things difficult for parents. In the U.S., some parents are driving hours just to get the right product for…

A fictionalized account of the Report of the Covid Commission

Imagining what a thorough investigation of the Trudeau government’s mismanagement of the COVID crisis might reveal

A fictionalized account of the Report of the Covid CommissionBy way of introduction, I come from a Canadian political family with 55 years experience in the political and public policy arenas; 33 of those in association with the legislature and government of the Province of Alberta and 22 in association with the Parliament of Canada. My father spent 13 years in the Canadian Senate,…

The best medicine? Humour can be a double-edged part of grieving

Can be a trigger for both grief and healing in people coping with the loss of a loved one

The best medicine? Humour can be a double-edged part of grievingWhen Donna Wilson pulled up to visit her aunt and uncle on their farm near Eatonia, Sask., a few years ago, she came across a comical scene: Her uncle Doug was running around the yard chasing turkeys. The birds kept jumping up on his dog and he was trying to shoo them away with a broom. It’s…

How technology affects the ethics of the nurse-patient relationship

The nurse-patient relationship is being re-shaped by the proliferation of technology

How technology affects the ethics of the nurse-patient relationshipWhen Gillian Lemermeyer decided at age 17 to become a nurse, she was following in her mother’s footsteps, so she expected her mom to be thrilled when she told her the news. “I was surprised when she grew very serious,” Lemermeyer remembers. “She said, ‘Okay, but do you understand what it means to be looking after…

Mild electrical stimulation could boost cognitive ability

Pilots, athletes, dementia patients and more could benefit from this brain boost

Mild electrical stimulation could boost cognitive abilityImagine putting on a helmet embedded with tiny electrodes that sit on your scalp, delivering a gentle electrical current to certain areas of your brain. After about 10 to 20 minutes, you might find yourself with a better ability to focus, sharper memory and a host of other cognitive benefits. That’s the idea behind a…

The consequences of the doctor shortage in Canada are grim

The evidence is overwhelming: Canada needs more doctors

The consequences of the doctor shortage in Canada are grimThe coronavirus pandemic has accomplished what a multitude of government reports could not – that is, to draw Canadians’ attention to a faltering health-care system characterized by a chronic shortage of beds, overflowing emergency departments, and limited numbers of surgical personnel and operating suites. The flaws have been there for decades, but willful blindness on…

Joanne Weber named first-ever research chair in deaf education

The only professor in academia working on deaf education

Joanne Weber named first-ever research chair in deaf educationThere is a fierce debate raging in the deaf community. Many audiologists believe sign language is obsolete, recommending instead that deaf children rely exclusively on technology such as cochlear implants and hearing aids. Sign language, they contend, interferes with learning to speak. Joanne Weber argues the whole dispute is absurd and unnecessary. The first Canada Research Chair in…

New targets found for diagnosing, treating aggressive cancers

A mystery solved, a paradigm shifted

New targets found for diagnosing, treating aggressive cancersResearchers working in a U of A laboratory have uncovered two previously unknown ways that metabolism triggers cancer cell growth, uncovering potential new pathways for diagnosis and treatment. Both papers come out of the laboratory shared by Evangelos Michelakis, professor and associate chair of research in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and Canada Research Chair in Applied Molecular and…
1 2 3 115